Connect with us

Monde

South Africans know what happens when you replace an intellectual, elite president with a populist one

Published

on

South Africans know what happens when you replace an intellectual, elite president with a populist one

On Wednesday (Nov. 9), Americans woke up to the reality that a charismatic populist buoyed by the support of a non-urban working class base was slated to become their next president. As South Africans, we’re here to say: We’ve been there America.

When Nelson Mandela decided to step down from just one term as president in 1999, many South Africans saw his successor as a natural fit. Thabo Mbeki was a well-spoken intellectual with an international master’s degree in economics and development, and an impressive activist record. As president, he spoke beautifully of the need for a “renaissance” that would restore the dignity of post-colonial Africa. Under his leadership, South Africa experienced an extended period of economic growth, and began to have confidence in its position as a beacon for human rights and progressive, globalized ideals on the continent and across world.

For a while, South Africa felt its reputation on the world stage was secured. So it came as a shock to many South Africans when the ANC took the drastic step to “recall” Mbeki in 2008, and replace him as president with Jacob Zuma, a relatively inexperienced but hugely popular politician.

Here was a man who had faced 783 corruption and racketeering charges, been tried and acquitted for rape, had only a 6th grade-level education; a polygamist with a slew of scandals with women outside of his four marriages. Zuma was the antithesis of Mbeki, and in many ways, a rejection of the globalized and dreamy-eyed vision of South Africa put forward by a technocrat. Zuma was a man of the people. Sound familiar?

It wouldn’t be fair, or smart, to draw a direct comparison between Mbeki and Obama, or between Zuma and Trump. In contrast to Obama, Mbeki was uncharismatic, intolerant of criticism, and had flawed and unpopular opinions about issues ranging from HIV/AIDS to Zimbabwe’s dictator Robert Mugabe. Unlike Trump, Zuma was well-respected for his political record (he spent ten years on Robben Island for his anti-apartheid activism) and ability to mediate conflict. His impoverished roots gave him a deft touch with South Africa’s marginalized poor black voters.

What’s familiar is the feeling of shock the liberal elite experienced when Zuma became president: the jarring discovery that many of their countrymen would seemingly ignore a person’s misogyny, crudeness (even allegations of corruption!) to ensure their views were represented. But embrace him they did.

Controversy only seemed to make Zuma stronger, from saying that showering after sex could prevent AIDS, to using an election anthem song that evoked going into battle with a machine gun.

“Curiously, the spectacle of the corruption and sex allegations proved a boon to Mr. Zuma’s political career,” The New York Times wrote in 2009. “Analysts say that Mr. Zuma became a magnet for a spectrum of groups unhappy with Mr. Mbeki’s aloof leadership, and that he deftly marshaled their discontent into a powerful movement.”

Zuma came into power when immigration, joblessness, and unhappiness with the political establishment had South Africans looking inward. “”He is a man who listens; he doesn’t take the approach of an intellectual king,” one South African was quoted as saying at the time. “Zuma is a person who is very close to the people,” said another. “Before his leadership, the ANC was for the elite. Now it will be for the people.”

Since then, the path has proved rocky.

Zuma’s populism endured—he was re-elected in 2012 for a second five-year term—and it shielded him from mounting accusations of corrupt political behavior and hapless leadership. The country floundered as the frustration and anger that fueled his electoral victories exploded into xenophobic violence in a battered economy. It struggled to process and proactively deal with destructive protests led by the young people who felt forgotten and sold-out.

When Zuma’s friends, the Gupta family, were allowed to use a strategic military air base to welcome a wedding party, we allowed him to plead ignorance on the inner workings of air travel logistics. And when he dipped into the state coffers, extracting $20 million to renovate his palatial private compound, we shrugged at his excuses, ranging from his right to a home like everyone else, to the fact that he didn’t understand the bureaucracy and paperwork of the public works department that oversaw the renovations. It’s become increasingly apparent that Zuma has used his position of power to enrich himself and his direct supporters at the expense of the very people he claimed to represent. When news of the most recent corruption scandal involving the president broke, Zuma and his allies dismissed it as a creation of a sensationalist media and a social media storm fuelled by the middle class, who Zuma once referred to as the “clever blacks.”

After two years of the Trump campaign, Americans should be familiar with this shrug-excuse-gaffe routine. Trump’s used it to successfully dismiss scandals ranging from tax evasion to sexual harassment.

Most South Africans have not succumbed to rage, but have found themselves overcome by a slow realization that the dream of a post-apartheid South Africa characterized by unity, equality and opportunity, is not yet a reality.

The saddest thing of all is that Zuma’s leadership built a wall between us—between the ordinary, often rural, or semi-urban impoverished South Africans for whom little had changed after apartheid, and the urban elite, a minority who was benefitting from the upward mobility of black people. As a country, we once represented the idea that a people could unify to overcome anything. Now we’re in danger of representing what happens when we let someone tear us apart.

South Africans still hope that the country’s constitution and democratic institutions will finally bring Zuma and his cronies to book and that together, we can rail against the ills weakening our democracy. South Africa’s public protector, a constitutionally protected ombud of state affairs, has consistently called Zuma and his administration out for wrongdoing. South Africa’s Constitutional Court has made sure that the president be held accountable, forcing him to pay back state money used in his personal renovations and appointing a judge to oversee the investigation into Zuma’s latest scandal.

In this regard, Americans too should have hope. Its institutions are strong, and its values enshrined in a strong constitution, which carries the same spirit of democratic ideals and South Africa’s—ours is just a bit younger. These documents are an embodiment of our nations’ conscience, enshrining ideals we hold dear like the values of fairness and humaneness that give rise to our identities as democracies.

America’s constitution has always been the light leading the country down the path of progress, an inspiration to others—to us. Institutions like the Supreme Court have made sure that this light is never snuffed out. And as long as people continue to believe and support these institutions, and in the values enshrined in the constitution, that light will not be snuffed out by the populism and demagoguery that threatens to overwhelm it.

Advertisement

Monde

Corée du Nord/Corée du Sud: Une rencontre historique ce vendredi entre Kim Jong Un et Moon Jae-In

Published

on

Kim Jong Un et Moon Jae-in se retrouveront pour un sommet historique ce vendredi. Deux sujets sensibles, les essais nucléaires nord-coréens et l’éventualité d’un traité de paix pour mettre fin formellement à la guère de 1950-53, devraient être évoqués. Le monde retient son souffle…

Une rencontre historique à la frontière. Ce vendredi, les dirigeants des deux Corées se retrouveront sur La ligne de démarcation militaire qui divise la péninsule, en vue de leur sommet. Un événement qui promet d’être hautement symbolique: lorsque Kim Jong Un franchira cette ligne, il deviendra le premier dirigeant nord-coréen à fouler le sol sud-coréen depuis la fin de la Guerre de Corée, il y a 65 ans.

Ce sommet sera seulement le troisième du genre, après deux réunions intercoréennes à Pyongyang en 2000 et 2007, et résulte de l’effervescence diplomatique qui s’est emparée ces derniers mois de la péninsule. La réunion doit être le précurseur d’un autre face-à-face historique très attendu, entre Kim Jong Un et le président américain Donald Trump.

La question de l’arsenal nucléaire nord-coréen devrait figurer parmi les sujets prioritaires. En 2017, Pyongyang a mené son essai nucléaire le plus puissant à ce jour et testé des missiles balistiques intercontinentaux (ICBM) mettant à sa portée le territoire continental des États-Unis.

Des tensions qui semblent s’apaiser depuis que Kim Jong Un a annoncé le 1er janvier, à la surprise générale, la participation de son pays aux jeux Olympiques d’hiver de Pyeongchang, au Sud. Un rapprochement spectaculaire s’en est suivi.

Les deux dirigeants pourraient aussi aborder la question d’un traité de paix pour mettre formellement un terme à la Guerre de 1950-1953. Le conflit s’était achevé sur un simple armistice si bien que les deux pays sont toujours techniquement en guerre. La reprise des réunions de familles divisées par la guerre pourrait également être discutée.

Après la séance du matin, les deux dirigeants iront à pied vendredi jusqu’à la Maison de la paix, où fut signé l’armistice.  Par la suite, les deux délégations déjeuneront chacune de leur côté, les Nord-Coréens franchissant la frontière dans l’autre sens pour leur collation.Et avant que début la séance de l’après-midi, Kim Jong Un et Moon Jae-In planteront un pin. Cet arbre “représentera la paix et la prospérité sur la Ligne de démarcation militaire, qui est le symbole de la confrontation et de la division depuis 65 ans”, a ajouté Im Jong-seok.

La terre viendra du Mont Paektu, endroit sacré aux yeux des Nord-Coréens, et du Mont Halla, sur l’île sud-coréenne de Jeju. Après la signature d’un accord, un communiqué conjoint devrait être publié.

Continue Reading

Monde

Insolite : Jake et Esme, ces jumeaux nés avec 5 ans d’écart

Published

on

Insolite : Jake et Esme, ces jumeaux nés avec 5 ans d’écart

Insolite : Jake et Esme, ces jumeaux nés avec 5 ans d’écart

L’incroyable histoire de ces jumeaux Jake et Esme qui font le buzz actuellement en Angleterre. Ils sont des vrais jumeaux, nés à cinq ans d’intervalle, car leurs parents avaient décidé de congeler l’un des deux embryons. L’histoire insolite de cette famille anglaise fait la Une de l’actualité.

En 2011, après avoir eu des complications de concevoir de nouveau, Claire et Ben Seddon se sont rendus dans un centre de fertilité de Manchester pour commencer un traitement de fertilité. Avec le programme pas moins de huit embryons se sont produits, parmi deux embryons étaient du même ovule, des jumeaux !

Certes au lieu d’opter pour une grossesse gémellaire, Claire Seddon avait décidé d’implanter un seul des embryons et a donné naissance en avril 2012 à Jake, un petit garçon. Quant a l’autre embryon, il a été conservé et congelé pendant cinq ans jusqu’à le couple décide de mettre au monde leur troisième enfant.

Et voila qu’une petite fille a vu le jour en février 2017, Esme. Elle reste la jumelle de Jake bien que cinq ans après. Claire Seddon s’est exprimée : « Jake adore le fait d’avoir une petite sœur. Il est tellement gentil avec elle, ils ont attendu longtemps avant de se rencontrer et d’être réunis à nouveau ! ».

Continue Reading

Monde

J.J DeAngelo, le “Golden State Killer”, arrêté après 40 ans 

Published

on

J.J DeAngelo, le "Golden State Killer", arrêté après 40 ans 

J.J DeAngelo, le “Golden State Killer”, arrêté après 40 ans

Les masquent tombent enfin!  Après quatre décennies de recherches et de chasse à l’homme, le « Golden State Killer » a finalement été identifié. Joseph James DeAngelo, ancien agent de police a été appréhendé par les forces de l’ordre pour une série de délits commis entre les années 70 et 80.

Le tueur du « Golden State », aussi connu en Californie comme le « harceleur nocturne », a à son actif une cinquantaine de viols, douze meurtres et cent vingt cambriolages. Ce dernier, aujourd’hui âgé de 72 ans, a été arrêté à son domicile à Sacramento, par les limiers de la force policière. La série noire s’était produite pour la plupart dans la Capitale de résidence de l’accusé.

L’arrestation est survenue, ce mercredi 25 avril, alors qu’un mandat d’arrêt avait formellement été émis la veille, a déclaré la procureure de Sacramento, Anne Marie Schubert, lors d’une conférence de presse. Joseph James DeAngelo qui a sévit pendant une dizaine d’années était parvenu à faire régner une ère de terreur à Sacramento. Nombre de résidents dormaient avec leurs fusils et s’étaient procurés des chiens pour prévenir les invasions nocturnes. Une peur qui a marqué les esprits des habitants du comté de Sacramento et des régions avoisinantes. Hors ses multiples crimes, la police soupçonne, également, le suspect d’être l’auteur de l’assassinât de son frère et de sa belle-sœur en 1980.

Alors que les années passées avaient servi à mettre aux oubliettes le tueur et violeur en série, l’adaptation littéraire des événements par l’écrivain Michelle McNamara, « I’ll be gone in the dark », a fait repasser de l’ombre à la lumière les crimes perpétrés par le « Golden State Killer ». Si la police n’attribue pas les rebondissements dans cette affaire à la publication du livre, elle soutient toutefois que celui-ci a contribué à « un flot d’informations » de la part du public. Le présumé coupable sera bientôt traduit en Cour de justice. Il risque la prison à perpétuité.

Continue Reading

Trending