Connect with us

Regional

La Tanzanie investit $3,5 millions dans un mur pour protéger ses minerais

Published

on

La Tanzanie investit $3,5 millions dans un mur pour protéger ses minerais

La Tanzanie investit $3,5 millions dans un mur pour protéger ses minerais

Le gouvernement de la Tanzanie affirme que les revenus tirés de ses pierres précieuses rares, le Tanzanite, ont quadruplé au premier trimestre de cette année par rapport à la même période l’an dernier.

Le Premier ministre Kassim Majaliwa

Le Premier ministre Kassim Majaliwa a déclaré mercredi aux législateurs que la Tanzanie avait gagné plus de 316,000 dollars grâce aux minerais et que le gouvernement avait décidé de limiter les vols.

Le président a inauguré la semaine dernière un mur de 24 km autour des mines dans le nord du pays dans le cadre des efforts visant à réduire le vol et la perte de revenus qui en resort. Les mines de Mirerrani produisent les rares gemmes de tanzanite bleu violet.

John Pombe Magufuli a ordonné à l’armée en septembre 2017 de construire le mur qui, selon les estimations, aurait coûté 3,5 millions de dollars au gouvernement.

La pierre de tanzanite bleu-violet se trouve uniquement dans cette nation de l’Afrique de l’Est, le pays est l’une des plus grandes économies de la région seulement derrière l’Éthiopie et le Kenya.

Le Dr John Joseph Magufuli est le président de la Tanzanie, en fonction depuis 2015

La contrebande de minerais est un casse-tête avec lequel la plupart des pays se débattent. Le mouvement intervient plusieurs mois après que le président ait ordonné la renégociation des concessions minières avec des sociétés multinationales.

Magufuli est réputé pour sa position anti-corruption qui a conduit au limogeage de hauts fonctionnaires. L’opposition, les groupes de défense des droits et l’église ont cependant dénoncé ce qu’ils disent être des tendances dictatoriales du président qui a pris le pouvoir en 2015.

Advertisement

Regional

Africa is ‘the most expensive country to send money’

Published

on

Africa is 'the most expensive country to send money'

Africa is ‘the most expensive country to send money’

According to the World Bank last year Africa was the most expensive country to send money. The World Bank said South Africa remains the costliest, in its analysis of trends in remittance service costs.

In its recent report for the first quarter of 2018, the World Bank put forward that remitting from South Africa gained an average cost of 17.13%.

It costs an average of 9% to send $200 (£143) to sub-Saharan Africa as of the start of 2018, while the global average cost is 7%. Both fall short of the UN’s sustainable development goal of 3%.

“While remittances are growing, countries, institutions, and development agencies must continue to chip away at high costs of remitting so that families receive more of the money,” says World Bank report author Dilip Ratha.

The World Bank says $466bn was sent worldwide in 2017.

That’s a rise of 8.5% since 2016.

The report states that this was driven by economic growth in Europe, Russia and the US.

This year the body expects growth of at least 4%.

Nigeria and Egypt – are two of Africa’s most populated nations with large diasporas –and hence they are among the world’s top remittance recipients, totaling $22bn and $20bn respectively last year

Continue Reading

Regional

Sex abuse in South Sudan: Nepali peacekeeper accused

Published

on

Sex abuse in South Sudan: Nepali peacekeeper accused

Sex abuse in South Sudan: Nepali peacekeeper accused

In South Sudan, a Nepalese peacekeeper has been accused of sexually abusing a teenager in the latest allegation against a so-called blue helmet.

In a statement the UN said that on 13th of April “four teenagers were caught trying to enter the United Nations base in Aweil through the perimeter fence”.

“It was alleged that one of the teenage girls had been touched inappropriately by a member of the Nepalese contingent in exchange for money.”

While on the contrary according to media reports, the UN statement rejects that there is an allegation of rape.

The UN said that Nepali authorities will conduct an enquiry.

The UN peacekeepers’ task is to safeguard weak civilians in conflict zones but they have been hit by a raft of child sex abuse scandals across Africa.

Continue Reading

Regional

South Africa: school toilets are reviewed

Published

on

South Africa: school toilets are review

South Africa: school toilets are reviewed

An inspection is been carried out in all school says the South African government. Its goal is to eliminate the usage of pit latrines after the death of two school children who had fallen into such toilets.

President Cyril Ramaphosa wants to eradicate the pit toilets within the next few months.

A court in Limpopo, on Monday instructed a school to eliminate all its pit toilets however it refused to give financial assistance to the parents of the boy who lost his life by drowning in a toilet four years ago.

According to the Human Right groups the use of pit latrines is a violation of a child’s right to dignity and hence they have made a request to the government to urgently build safe facilities.

Continue Reading

Trending